Vogue 7975: A Quilted Boho Version

Vogue 7975 quilting the fashion fabric

For my next White Tree Fabrics project I have decided to make a quilted boho (?) style jacket using some gorgeous Geninne Cloud9 organic cotton. It is the sashiko bird navy colourway and I have already washed, dried and iron this fabric. It is colour fast and wonderfully soft and smooth without being too lightweight either.

Here is my inspiration:

Quilted jacket inspiration - the Emerline print quilted jacket by Monsoon. [Source]

Quilted jacket inspiration – the Emerline print quilted jacket by Monsoon (2013). [Source]

The inspiration jacket features princess seams front and back, welt pockets, a centre front zip fastening and a combination of mirrored and pom pom trim. The inspiration jacket has the lining quilted to the outer fashion fabric, but as I explain below, I have decided not to do that. My jacket is not going to have any fastenings and I have ordered some trim, but I am not sure whether, yet, it will be entirely suitable.

I am using Vogue 7975 as my pattern. I have already made this jacket once before. I took it out of the wardrobe today and tried it on and I am actually astounded at the fact it doesn’t look that bad, given that I made this jacket quite early on in my sewing life. Ok, there are things I wish I had done differently and the size needs slight tweaking, but it wasn’t too bad. If anything at least it has given me a muslin to work from.

In this picture you can see the outer fashion fabric and also the printed cotton I plan on using to line the jacket. The lining fabric, featuring a stag print, was bought locally to me. I don’t know if it is one of the Liberty’s of London rejects that they used to print…

Moody Blues by Geninne - Sashiko Bird Navy Organic Cotton and Stag Print Cotton for Quilted Version of Vogue 7975

Moody Blues by Geninne – Sashiko Bird Navy Organic Cotton and Stag Print Cotton for Quilted Version of Vogue 7975

As mentioned above, I am not quilting the lining to the outer fashion fabric. This is because I think the quilting will be too hard to manage, in order to achieve a pucker free finish on both the lining and the outer fabric. Also, I don’t want to hand sew seams or flat fell seams on this project, so I have decided to quilt the outer fashion fabric to the wadding and then line the jacket.

Here’s the details of the wadding I am using:

Vogue 7975 quilted jacket wadding details

Vogue 7975 quilted jacket wadding details

I have no idea if this is the most appropriate type of wadding to use…I chose it because it is not very lofty and seemed the easiest to work with!

I am working with a total of 3 metres of outer fashion fabric. Today I laid my pattern pieces (still to be adjusted) out roughly on the fashion fabric and decided, to make the quilting process more manageable, to cut the fabric in half and quilt one half at a time. It took me just over 2 hours to put all the diagonal quilting lines on one half, and I made a small start on the diagonal lines that run at 90 degrees to the first set. My quilting lines are approx. 2 inches apart (to create 2 inch squares).

Vogue 7975 quilting the fashion fabric

Vogue 7975 quilting the fashion fabric

I used my walking foot throughout, and the guide it comes with (the metal bar above) to make sure I was getting lines 2 inches apart.

Here’s what it looks like so far:

Vogue 7975 quilting the fashion fabric

Vogue 7975 quilting the fashion fabric

So that’s where I am at. This is a project which is going to take a little time. And, to be honest, I don’t know what the outcome is going to be like, or even if I will like it. But that’s part of fun of sewing, isn’t it? Isn’t it?

 I have spent probably about 7 hours quilting so far! And I am about three quarters of the way through. Am I foolish? Or am I dedicated? You decide. I tend to do it in not more than 1 hour blocks, just to avoid complete brain death. It’s not hard once the first line is sewn. The other lines just run parallel to that one. But it is certainly quite boring. Put on something interesting to listen to, or to watch.

Here are my pattern modifications:

  • For this version I am making long sleeves (as opposed to 3/4 or bracelet length). This is a jacket which will be worn in cooler weather so I feel longer sleeves are more appropriate. I cut the sleeve at the line for view C/D and added 2 inches to the length.
  • I have added 1.5 inches to the length of all the pattern pieces
  • I added about 1 inch in total to the front of the jacket only, running from just above bust point down to bottom of the jacket, so this 1 inch is split equally over the front princess seams.
  • I did a 1 inch sway back adjustment.
  • I have added 3/8ths of an inch to all the seam allowances to make a total of 1 inch seam allowances. There are two reasons for this:
    1. Someday I may get round to making a quilted French Style Tweed Jacket thing, and on my Craftsy class (that I purchased for this purpose) you are told to use 1 inch seam allowances to allow for potential fraying of fabric. So this means I kill two birds with one stone.
    2. I think I will only actually use 5/8ths of an inch seam allowance to sew the current jacket and the 3/8ths will hopefully allow for any bulk added by the quilting. I can always make the jacket smaller if it feels too big. So it is a little bit of a built in safety factor.

That’s all I got for you today. Tomorrow I got a busy day of running to piano lessons, dentist appointments (for my daughter) and taking her to her swimming class so maybe by the weekend I can get to the cutting out stage.

Vogue 7975 quilted cotton version

In addition to the fairly lengthy quilting process involved in preparing the fabric to make this jacket, the actual sewing process also took a fair amount of time. This was because I removed the batting from all the seam allowances before pressing seams. Further more, I ended up fiddling around with the fit, due to my brilliant idea of adding in the 3/8ths of an inch to all the seams: turns out that this was completely unneccessary, and I ended up removing a fair bit from the waist at the back and side seams. I also ended up removing 1 inch from the top of the armholes to raise the sleeves up, and added in sleeve heads, drafted using this tutorial from Poppykettle.

Vogue 7975 quilted cotton version

 

The jacket is fully lined with a cotton lining. I don’t like the way it looks in the next photo, but that’s cotton: it will wrinkle. I machine bagged the lining. I ended up weighing the hem of the jacket down by hand sewing in a length of gold chain. It does make the jacket sit closer to the body. At present this jacket does not have any closures, and I quite like that. I wish I had used the gold chain for the hanging loop and not the silver! Regret! But, the hem chain was a last minute addition so I have to live with it.

Vogue 7975 quilted cotton version - lining, hem chain, hanging loop and label

Vogue 7975 quilted cotton version – lining, hem chain, hanging loop and label

The trim was purchased online and machine sewn on. If you follow me on Instagram you would have seen that I originally planned on including a pom pom trim, as per my inspiration jacket. But truth be told, it was too much. My balls were just too big. So I chopped them off. ;-)

Vogue 7975 quilted cotton version - trim closeup

Vogue 7975 quilted cotton version – trim closeup

Vogue 7975 quilted cotton version

Vogue 7975 quilted cotton version

In conclusion this jacket is beautifully soft and cosy, but without being heavy or cumbersome. Perfect for a cool autumn day. I think it’s very…pretty…and I feel smart when I wear it, but casual at the same time. However, I am struggling a little on how to style it. I definitely think because it’s quite a statement in it’s own right it’s got to be paired with plain, simple items. A new white shirt is on my list of autumn sewing but how would you guys wear it?

Hope you all have a great week.

Vogue 7975 quilted cotton version

Vogue 7975 quilted cotton version

Over and out!

Vogue 7975 quilted cotton version